Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA
RE/MAX Leading Edge | 781-944-6060 | marilynellis@remax.net


Posted by Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA on 11/30/2017

Buying a retirement home is a big decision. And doing so before you retire is a smart decision. However, youíre also in a completely different place than you will be when youíre retired or as you age. You donít know what the future holds. Itís easy to take our mobility for granted until we lost it. There are a few things you should look for in a home to plan for the future and whatever it may hold.

Many empty-nesters look to downsize when buying their next home. And this very well might be the perfect option for you. But first, consider how often and how many guests you may want to have over at a time. Will you host holiday dinners or want to have room for grandchildren to stay for the night? If you have a large family or one that is growing many couples find they want the room to host dinners or have a pull-out couch.

Youíll also want to plan ahead for the future when choosing the size and layout of your new home. Even if you downsize itís wise to put wide hallways and a single floor plan on your wishlist as you house hunt. If either of you has mobility limitations in the future youíll be glad to have such an accessible home.

The lower your monthly payments on your new mortgage, the better. But more ideally youíll want to consider homes in a price range that allow you to pay in full. Again, keeping retirement in mind keeping bills to a minimum so that either one of you can cover all costs on one sole income could save you from hardship down the line. Retirement is very different from what it used to be, often many people find themselves needing to take on part-time work to get by. Keeping expenses well below your monthly income can help to ensure you can spend your retirement years enjoying life in the way you want to.

In general, when planning retirement itís best to live below your means. Not only do you want to account for inflation costs but also for any unexpected large expenses that could crop up such as home repairs, emergency care, or car maintenance. Having an idea of what your future budget will be as well as your current one will help you make the best decisions for the years ahead now.

Buying a retirement home can save you money in the long run on bills like heating and electric. However, house hunting for the perfect home entails a lot more decisions that many couples realize. Remember to plan for your life both now and later when putting together your must have features for your new home.





Posted by Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA on 10/26/2017

Are you planning on moving in the next 6-8 months? Donít let your belongings take ownership of you. As consumers, we tend to accumulate a lot of ďstuffĒ over the years. After spending 5, 10, or 20-plus years in one home, this can amount to more than some of us can handle. Do you have more than 4 sets of dishes? How about piles of toys & board games from when your kids were younger? And then there are those passed-down antiques that no one in the family seems to have use for, yet no one wants to throw away.

 

Rather than rush while packing and having to take the whole mess with you to your next home, consider starting the process early! You can categorize your belongings into the following groups:

 

  • Keep
  • Sell
  • Donate
  • Throw it away


It may be hard to discern which category an item goes in. This is why itís a great idea to solicit help when youíre moving and downsizing your piles of stuff. An outsider can be a bit more objective to help you see whatís useful and what isnít. 


The Keep Pile


The items you want to keep through your move are those that you use every single day. Thereís no question in your mind that youíll need these things at your next residence. Think of the items that are either irreplaceable or still in good working condition like bedding, the coffee pot, furniture, and personal items like books, DVDs, and electronics. 


Sell For Profit


If you have a question about any of the items that youíre going through, you may want to consider selling them. Is your sofa still in good condition, but wonít fit well into your new place? Itís time to get that piece of furniture to another good home and make a bit of cash while youíre at it. There are tons of websites, apps, and other resources that connect you with people who are looking for the items that you want to get rid of.


Donate


Some items may not be an easy sell. You may not even have the time to sell them. This is where donation centers allow you to do some good while youíre cleaning out your things. As youíre packing for the move go through things like clothes, books, DVDs, games, toys, and other knickknacks. Those figurines that have been sitting on the shelf may not be ideal for your new house. 

Itís also a good idea to keep the amount of space that youíre dealing with in mind. If you have less space, downsizing will be ever important. On the flip side, if youíre moving into a bigger house, you donít necessarily need to fill it up!


Trash Pile


Unfortunately, weíll always have a few things that need to be thrown out. Items that are ripped, stained, worn, broken, or plain useless must face the fate of the dumpster. 


No matter how you go about cleaning out your home before a move, you should know that it will feel amazing to have a lighter load to move as the clutter is cleaned out.             





Tags: moving tips   downsizing  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA on 12/4/2012

There comes a time when families start to think about senior members moving. Factors such as retirement, finances, lifestyle, health or the distance between family members are just a few of the reasons why seniors may decide to relocate. Moving is a big decision especially when a senior has lived in one place for a very long time. Many things must be considered, including access to health care, recreation, social activities and practical concerns, such as grocery stores, libraries, climate, etc. Access to Quality Care For many seniors access to health care or options for health care assistance is the primary reason for moving. When considering options it is important look at the short-term solutions, but also consider long term scenarios. Options may include drop-in help, moving closer to a family member that can assist when needed or retirement communities that offer fully independent living to supportive assistance as required. Community Services It is also important to research the area community services. You will want to make note of services such as homecare, cleaning services, snow removal, transportation and home repair. Some individuals may want access to volunteer organizations or senior centers where they can be involved in the community. Support As an older adult, moving is an especially difficult transition. Finding the support the senior needs in the new community is imperative. Groups that seniors can connect with will help the transition go smoother. Connect with church groups, home visit solutions or perhaps meetings that would be conducted in a home setting. Here are some websites that may help you in your transition: ēEldercare Locator ēAARP ēElder Web: Online Eldercare Sourcebook ēAmerican Society on Aging (ASA) ēSenior Resource Housing: Information on Housing Options