Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA
RE/MAX Leading Edge | 781-944-6060 |

Posted by Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA on 2/15/2018

Moving is tough for many reasons, from bidding on a house to packing up all your possessions stress is bound to happen. However, for children, it can be more stressful. Change can be harder for them to deal with and they can feel lost in the bustle of the move. There are a few things you can do for your child to ensure that the moving process goes smoothly for both them and you: Model behavior - Project a positive attitude about moving will demonstrate to your child that this is a positive event for them to look forward to, children pick up on the behavior of the adults in their lives and signaling to them that is a time they can anticipate with excitement with your behavior about moving can go a long way. Have conversations - Take the time to talk with your child about moving and what they can expect about a month before the move date. Be open to their thoughts and feelings and give them some space to feel upset. Explain the moving process to them in a simple way that they can understand, perhaps with a story played out with their toys. Ensure to not only tell them what will change but also what will stay the same. The more they know what to expect of the days leading up to and after the move the more comfortable they will feel with the process. Get them involved - If possible include them in the house hunting process by showing them pictures of the new house. If you are moving to a new town or state show them pictures of the school they will attend and the nearby parks. If it is nearby, explore the new neighborhood together and make visits to the new house a few times before moving day. Keep things similar - If your child doesn't deal well with change try to keep the same furniture and arrange in a similar layout as their old room. Prioritize having your child's room in order before the rest of the house so that they have their own space to feel comfortable in the new house right away. Unpacking their favorite toys or blankets first can help them feel more at home. Sticking to the same routines where possible is also ideal. On the other hand - Allowing your child to pick out new furniture and paint colors for their new room can help them get excited about the new move and give them some control amidst so many changes. Making friends - Practice with your child how to introduce themselves to other children. Get involved with the new community and allow your child to signup for any activities that interest them. Arrange times for phone calls or to write letters to friends and family from your old neighborhood so they feel in touch with those they care for. While moving can be a stressful time for the whole family, it can have a large impact on a child. Making time for conversations and including them in the process can not only help them feel more at ease with the moving process but also deepen your relationship with your child as you go through this life event together.

Tags: moving tips   moving   children  
Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA on 6/22/2017

Moving into a new house is a doorway to new opportunities, experiences and friendships.Depending on the size and layout of your house, you'll gain more space and style. You'll also gain a jam packed schedule, miles of driving and sore muscles. On the flip side, you could let professional movers take care of the heavy lifting.

Pros you get when you hire professional movers

The chance to avoid heavy lifting that's inherit in a house move aside, working with professional movers is not all upswing. Balance the pros and cons of paying professional movers to take you from your current to your new home. To get started, consider:

Experience counts - You may have moved two to three times on your own, struggling with friends to get a sofa or widescreen television up a flight of steps. Professional movers have helped relocate individuals and families dozens or more times. If it takes you eight hours to move a three bedroom house, professional movers might complete the job in less than three hours.

House moving supplies - Professional movers keep supplies on hand. You won't have to pay for protective covers, tape or dollies.

Forget the driving - Relocate to another city or state and you may not have to drive. To get professional movers to drive for you, include transportation in the contract that you sign with movers. Expect to pay for transportation services by the mile. Only work with movers who insure your household goods. If your employer is picking up these costs, this is a huge energy saver.

Cons associated with professional movers

Don't just focus on the pros. Consider the following cons of working with professional movers to decide if hiring an experienced team is the best option.

Price - Professional movers can be pricey. For long distance moves, you'll generally pay for insurance, mileage and the actual moving services. Some movers encourage you to leave a tip.Companies like UHaul list area movers that may or may not offer you a discount.

You're not completely in charge - Although you get to set move start and end times, should movers run late on a previous job, they might not show up at your home on time. You also may not be able to tell movers which furniture pieces to load onto the moving truck first.

Boxes - Depending on the home moving company that you hire, you could be responsible for getting your own moving boxes. If you do get home moving boxes from professional movers, it could cost you $1 or more per box.

You may still have to pack and unpack -If you pack and unpack yourself, you'll save money even if you work with movers.

A house move"to do" list can get long quickly. Hiring professional movers could shift half of the moving responsibilities from you to contractors. Just make sure that you understand moving company rules. Also, communicate clear start and end dates and times. Above all, get references and only enter into agreements with professional movers you can trust.

Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Marilyn Ellis, CBR, CHMS, LMS, HAFA on 6/24/2014

As they say real estate is about 3 things: location, location, location.  Finding the perfect city, town, or village to live can be difficult especially if you have a family to take care after. If you are still midst-career and not looking to retire you probably want to live close to work (maybe not too close) , family, and to what is important for you to live in town. The first tip is simple, you can use sites such as to find out more about the area.  City websites with a .gov domain can provide a lot of insight, but don't forget to do a simple google search or look at the Wikipedia page of that place when they are available.  You can find out just about anything these days:  population, school systems, cost of the average house, and even average city income of the residents.  Most of this information is available thanks to the census of course, so this is a great time to do research as the information was last collected in 2010 as part of a 10 year cycle. Google maps has a great feature called my places.  Other maps offer similar features if you prefer another, but essentially what you do is create your own map.  There is a link to take an interactive tour underneath the big red create map button if you need help.  It is a very well made tour.  After all of your important locations are marked and labeled you can zoom out a bit and see all of the locations clearly.  There are certain exceptions such as highway access, but somewhere in the middle is generally a good place to start looking.  Combine this with the town information you can find and suddenly you are well on your way to being an expert on the area.  You can even generate driving directions and estimates to and from each location. This is great news of course, because the more you know, the better your decision will be.

Categories: Relocating